Recipe: Easy Sausage Frittatta

Frittattas like Pizza, are among Italy’s most popular and humble dishes, a classic “poor people’s” food that would allow to create a more well-rounded meal by utilizing whatever was left in the pantry and then adding some eggs and flour. A frittatta base is always the same, it’s fast to make and very lowcarb (for those who are trying to cut down on carbs in their diet) or alternatively vegetarian.

Today, I had some leftover pork sausages from the local market as well as eggs, onions and leek in the fridge. The obvious thing was to make a tasty frittatta! There’s little you cannot use in a frittatta….icecream, maybe?

~ Easy Frittatta Recipe ~
(for 2 people as a main dish or 4 as a side)

  • 5 small eggs
  • 4 small sausages
  • 1 big onion, 1 small leek stalk
  • ~2dl milk
  • Olive oil, salt, pepper, herbs
  • All-purpose flour

Cut the meats and vegetables into small cubes or strips and stir-fry in olive oil until golden. Use an iron skillet or frying pan with at least a 2cm high rim to hold the rising frittatta.

frittatta01In a separate bowl, first whisk some milk with 1 table spoon of flour. Add the eggs and whisk further until even consistency is achieved. Add salt, pepper and herbs to taste. I like using chives or dill, oregano or herbs de provence depending on the frittatta.

frittatta02Douse the stiry-fry with the egg mix and put a lid on for approx. 10mins at medium to high heat. If the frittatta isn’t rising, increase heat. Lay a plate on top of the frittatta inside the pan, to turn it around and let the other side get some heat for another 3 minutes. The frittatta will rise considerably after you flipped it around.

frittatta03Cut the frittatta in quarters and enjoy with some sour cream, chutney or chlli flakes on top! Bon apetito!

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Pizza! For When the Busy Takes Over.

Hey folks, it’s been awhile since I posted here, hasn’t it? I had to take a break from blogging about food in order to grow some! Late April to early June is prime time in our garden, when the seedlings start growing into actual plants and lots of care is needed to make sure they become strong and healthy.  So far, so good as far as all that goes. And with all the good that has been going, meal time has become something of a challenge, especially on the weekends when we do most of our garden work. After being out in the yard all day, the last thing we want to do is cook.

This is where pizza comes in.

I love pizza. You love pizza. We all love pizza! And homemade pizza gets lots of love in our house, partly because it’s so easy to manage when we’re bone tired. And while you can’t go wrong with the basics – tomato and cheese, pepperoni and sausage, pepper and onion, etc., sometimes it’s nice to branch out into other flavor territories. So here are a couple recipes that we came up with when more than the basics are required: Buffalo chicken white pizza and artichoke, sun-dried tomato, and feta pizza. (So delicious, both!) I’ve also included a sauce recipe that’s become a staple whenever fresh tomatoes are not available. Either recipe can be made on the pizza crust of your choice — fresh, pre-made, flavored, wheat, white — the sky’s the limit! Cooking the pizza is up to you, whether you use a pan, pizza stone, or are maybe lucky enough to have a pizza oven. For our usual setup of individual pan pizzas, I cook the crust alone first for about 10 minutes at 375-400 degrees. Then I take the pizzas out of the oven, add the toppings, then put them back in for 13-15 minutes.

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Semi-homemade pizza sauce

  • 1 can of diced tomatoes with basil, oregano, and garlic (If you like a lighter sauce, only drain the tomatoes slightly. Drain fully if you want a thicker sauce.)
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • dash of ground pepper
  • 1/2-1 tablespoon agave nectar (Recommend the agave over white sugar as it mixes better, but you could use white sugar. Go with a smaller amount of sweetener at first and add more to taste.)

Blend all ingredient together using a blender or stick blender. Let rest for about 30 minutes prior to using to let the dried herbs soften up a bit. Recipe makes enough for 2 large pizzas.

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Buffalo chicken white pizza

Ingredient list:

  • chicken (white and/or dark meat, whatever your preference)
  • flour
  • egg white
  • water
  • panko or white bread crumbs
  • corn meal
  • salt
  • pepper
  • oil, sliced or diced
  • butter
  • hot sauce
  • garlic powder
  • onions
  • whole milk mozzarella cheese (really, don’t skimp on the cheese! A little goes a long way.)

For buffalo chicken, cut up chicken into strips about an inch wide. Coat in flour, then dip into a mixture of 1 egg white and 1 tablespoon of water, then coat with a mixture of panko, corn meal, salt, and pepper. Fry chicken strips in about 1/2-inch of oil over medium heat, about 4-6 minutes per side or until golden brown. Drain chicken on paper towels and let cool.

For the buffalo sauce – whisk together 1/2 cup of melted butter and 1/2 cup hot sauce. (Can adjust to taste.)

One chicken is cool to the touch, cut into small chunks and place in a ziploc bag. Pour in a enough buffalo sauce, and shake everything around, so that it liberally covers the chicken. (You’ll want to have enough sauce left over for two drizzles over the pizza.)

Also saute or caramelize the onions.

For garlic butter sauce, in a small container with a lid, add 2 tablespoons of melted butter and 2 teaspoons garlic powder. Put lid on a shake vigorously.

Prepare pizza: Brush garlic butter on crust. Sprinkle with shredded mozzarella cheese. Add chicken and onions. Drizzle a little buffalo sauce over the top. Cook until crust is golden brown. Drizzle a little more buffalo sauce over pizza before serving.

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Artichoke, sun-dried tomato, and feta pizza

Ingredient list:

  • artichoke hearts, quartered and marinated
  • sun-dried tomatoes (dry packed, not the ones in oil)
  • feta cheese
  • whole milk mozzarella cheese.
  • semi-homemade pizza sauce

Throw the sauce and cheeses on your pizza crust. Cut up a desired amount of artichokes and sun-dried tomatoes, and place liberally on top. While cooking, you may want to keep an eye on the pizza as sun-dried tomatoes have tendency to burn. (P. S. If you happen to like black olives, they work well on this pizza, sliced and in small quantities. Too many and it gets too salty.)


While Cary’s happy to talk food here, she’s also pretty good at doling out words about video games at United We Game while simultaneously maintaining her own blog, Recollections of Play. You can also find an archive of fun, geeky articles from her and like-minded souls at Geek Force Network.

Want the Perfect Iced Coffee? Try Cold-Brewing.

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In my neck of the sorta-northern U. S. woods, it’s common to see the flip flops come out when the outside thermometer reaches 60 degrees. While I don’t follow this particular footwear routine, I do have a similar mantra concerning weather and coffee: “60 degrees means iced coffee!”

But the thing about iced coffee, as obtained from a proper coffee establishment, is that it’s expensive. Maybe I’m overly thrifty, but having to pay up to a dollar more to have someone add ice to a cup of coffee is perplexing. So over the years I’ve tried to make my own…without much success. I tried brewing my normal coffee, letting it cool, and adding ice, but that never cut it. The coffee always ended up tasting weak and watered down. I tried brewing exceptionally strong coffee – espresso and French roasts. The results were better, but since I’m not a fan of dark roasts generally, I never found the tastes of these brews appealing. I tried k-cups that were supposedly designed to make iced coffee. They weren’t. (Quite the sham they are.) I eventually gave up on the notion of ever making great iced coffee at home. That is until I discovered cold-brewed coffee.

As I’ve come to discover, cold brewing produces an amazing cup of coffee. The process removes much of coffee’s inherent bitterness and acidity and leaves you with coffee that’s rich, bold, and very smooth. Best of all, because the resulting coffee is so concentrated, it requires some dilution, which occurs anyway with iced coffee, what with all the melting ice. Despite this, the taste remains as wonderful as a full-strength cup o’ joe.

The Internet is full of recipes for cold-brewed coffee/iced coffee, and here’s one more. It’s so very simple, if a little time consuming. Fair warning, my recipe here is specifically based on using an 11-ounce bag of ground coffee, the size of which is most prevalent in my grocery stores. (A good bit of trial and error was involved here as a lot of recipes call for 10 or 12 ounces of coffee, and you’d be surprised how much that makes a difference in the final results.)

The perfect cold-brewed iced coffee

For the coffee concentrate:
  • One 11-ounce bag of course ground coffee
  • 6 2/3 cups of cold water
  • A fridge-safe container large enough to hold 7-8 cups
  • Another fridge-safe container that holds at least 1.5 quarts
  • For straining, a fine mesh sieve, cheesecloth and/or coffee filters
  • A funnel

In a sealable container (one that’ll fit in your fridge and hold at least 8 cups), pour in the ground coffee and then the water. Stir the mixture until all the grounds are incorporated. (If you’re using a bottle-type container, shake vigorously, with the cap on, of course.) Put the container in the fridge and let it rest for at least 10 hours but not more than 14. (I’ve read that this time frame is the optimal. I’ve not tried it longer for longer than 14 hours – too scared to waste more coffee than I already have!)

After brewing, it’s time to strain out the grounds. Line your sieve with 1-2 coffee filters or several layers of cheesecloth, place it in the top of properly sized funnel, and then place your funnel into whatever container will hold the concentrate. Working in small batches, and replacing the filters or cheesecloth when needed, strain the concentrate from the grounds into the new container. (With waiting for a batch of liquid/grounds to strain out, this process took about 45 minutes, and I came away with about 1.25 quarts of concentrate. Your results may vary.)

To make iced coffee:
  • 1/2 cup of liquid gold, i.e. the coffee concentrate
  • 6 ounces of cold water
  • 1-2 ounces of cream, half-and-half, or milk
    (If you like your coffee sweet, a dash of simple syrup would do the trick.)

Pour all the ingredients into a tall glass filled with ice, stir, and enjoy. If my ratios don’t work for you, simply adjust the dilution. Once you have the concentrate made, the rest is really up to your taste buds!


While Cary’s happy to talk food here, she’s also pretty good at doling out words about video games at United We Game while simultaneously maintaining her own blog, Recollections of Play. You can also find an archive of fun, geeky articles from her and like-minded souls at Geek Force Network.

Recipe: Delicious Shortbread with Strawberries and Whipped Cream

Shortbread is the food of the gods. This easy to bake, deliciously addictive, buttery and crumbly biscuit may be Scotland’s greatest vindication where cuisine is concerned. Traditional shortbread is made of nothing but awesome butter, sugar and flour and will save your ass when facing a sudden onslaught of uninvited guests. To go the extra mile, add fresh strawberries and whipped cream to make this an unforgettable dessert experience!

~ Basic Shortbread Recipe ~
(for about 30 or so biscuits)

  • 300g plain white flour
  • 200g butter (unsalted)
  • 100g white sugar
  • small pinch of salt
  • optional: some liquid vanilla extract

Add all ingredients in a bowl and knead with your bare hands until the dry crumbly mass sticks together. Roll the dough (I prefer 5-6mm for thickness but no less than 3mm) and cut into whatever shape you prefer. I’m lazy, so I do uneven squares.

Place on the baking sheet and bake for 15-20mins at 180°C. Once the biscuits start turning a dark golden around the edges, remove from the oven and leave on a cooling rack for at least 15mins.

shortbread02

We already ate a few…

This is where you’re done with the basic shortbread recipe – but we’re just halfway! For divine foodgasm, slice up some fresh strawberries and give them a nice tumble with a bit of powder/icing sugar in a bowl. Next, whip up some cream until light and fluffy.

~ How to serve ~

I like to do three layers of biscuits (still slightly warm after baking) per person or serving. Use a small dessert bowl and start off with some strawberries on the bottom. Break one biscuit in half (or quarters depending on size) and then cover with a spoonful of whipped cream. Rinse and repeat until you’re satisfied with the quantity. Always finish with cream and strawberries on top.

Congratulations – you have officially entered shortbread heaven! OMNOMNOM

shortbread

Fair warning: guests will be back for more.

Recipe: Seasoned Wild Rice with Tomato & Cucumber Salad

Lately I’ve been going back to the home-cooking of my childhood and some of my favorite recipes are all about the rice. Wild rice mix is a very satisfying option to plain white rice but it screams for color and flavors. For some reason I always loved acidic and vinegary combos with wild rice, so this is one easy and quick recipe to preparing a rice dish for yourself that’s both wholesome and very tasty!

~ Ingredients ~
(serves 2 people)

  • 375 grams of wild rice mix
  • 7.5dl vegetable stock / bouillon
  • 1 big carrot
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 red tomatoes
  • 1/2 of a (Nostrano) cucumber
  • Olive oil, white vinegar, slice of lemon

salad

First off chop the onion, tomatoes and cucumber into small, same size cubes. I prefer Nostrano cucumbers for taste and less kernels but any salad cucumber works (I also remove the gooey kernels from the tomatoes). Mix everything in a bowl and add some olive oil, vinegar and a squeeze of fresh lemon. Put the salad aside to rest, ideally for about 30mins.

rice01

Bring your vegetable stock/bouillon to a boil while chopping the carrot into very small cubes. Add the wild rice and carrots and lower to medium temperature. Let the rice cook for ~20mins with only an occasional stir. Add a flake of butter before serving next to the tomato and cucumber salad. Enjoy the flavor combination of the sweet rice with that very fresh salad!

rice02

Recipe Challenge: Fried Rice with Mushrooms

Mushrooms and I have a…well…rocky relationship. That’s to say I’ve spent the better part of my life avoiding them. For many years, they simply struck out in both the taste and texture departments. (Unless they were hidden so deeply in a dish as to be completely unrecognizable.) But some years ago I learned about the nutritional benefits of mushrooms, and since then have been trying to accept them into my life. I can now eat mushrooms on a pizza without wincing and can make a suitable mushroom gravy when needed. I’ve also been cooking with them more as I would any regular vegetable. The results have been…not the worst, but I still have a long way to go in become the world’s greatest mushroom chef.

Part of this re-examination of mushrooms has involved trying different varieties. For the most part, and thanks to their explosion of the 2000s, portabella mushrooms have been my go-to. But our local grocery store has upped its game in the produce section, and now all sorts of mushrooms are readily available. One of the newest things now for sale is this:

mushroom mix

“Exotic blend?” Erm, well…okay. Save for the portabellas, I guess shitake and oyster mushrooms still count as exotic these days. I brought them home with no plan of what to do with them. Only then entered in a challenge put forth by 8bit’s ringleader Liores: create a recipe using three chosen ingredients — peppers (hot or bell), mushrooms, and eggs. Well now…suddenly my fancy, exotic mushrooms took on a whole new meaning.

In thinking of meals that might include mushrooms, peppers, and eggs, my thoughts naturally turned towards breakfast — omelets, scrambles, fritattas, and such seemed perfect for such ingredients. Well, that is if the thought of eating mushrooms for breakfast didn’t give me pause. I needed something where the mushrooms would be suitably cooked and “disappear” into the dish. With that in mind, one meal jumped out: fried rice! Oh yes, what better way to incorporate different vegetables into one dish with (usually) good results? Hence my newest creation: Fried Rice with Mushrooms!

Now, to say that I have a fried rice “recipe” would be a lie. Fact is, fried rice is one of those nice dishes where you can throw in a little of this and a lot of that and smidge of something else, and most of the time, things turn out okay. So instead of a traditional list of ingredients and instructions, I’m going the sorta kinda play-by-play route, which, you should know, is unheralded as I’m perfectly awful at taking pictures of my cooking while it is happening. Apologies here for any blurry images.

Fried Rice with Mushrooms

First up in prep, the veggies. Here we have (going counterclockwise from bottom left), the mushroom mix (portabella, shittake, oyster), a large serving of broccoli spears, half a white onion, a few baby carrots, one egg, one bunch of scallions, and a bell pepper. Taking half the mushroom mix (about 4 ounces), I chopped everything up into bite-sized pieces.

ingredients - veggies

Next, we have the oil and spices. From left to right, teriyaki sauce, rice vinegar, canola oil, garlic powder, salt, and pepper.

ingredients - spices

And finally, the cooked and slightly cooled rice. (In this case white jasmine, because it was all I had.)

rice

Now onto the stove. First, heat a couple tablespoons of oil in a large pan or wok over medium high heat. Then add in onion, pepper, and carrot. (If you like, you can also add in some chopped garlic.) Sauté until the carrots have softened a bit — about 8 minutes.

friedrice1

Then throw in the broccoli and mushrooms. Keep on stirring and cooking until the mushrooms have browned – another 5-6 minutes.

friedrice2

In a small bowl, lightly beat the egg. In the wok, create a small well in the center of the pan by moving your veggies out and up the sides a bit. Drop the egg into the center of the pan. Let it cook from about 2 minutes before incorporating it into the mixture.

friedrice3

Once the egg has been stirred in, fold in approximately 1 1/2 cups of the cooked rice.

friedrice4

Season the mixture with 3-4 tablespoons of teriyaki sauce, 1 tablespoon of rice vinegar, a couple good shakes of garlic powder, and salt and pepper to taste. Stir well and let the rice and veggies cook over heat for 3-4 minutes more.

friedrice5

Sprinkle scallions over the rice and let them warm through.

friedrice6

Serve the fried rice warm on its own or with your favorite Asian-inspired meat dish and/or egg rolls and/or whatever else you like.

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As a postscript, I must say that this recipe considerably changed my opinion of mushrooms. They lent delightfully hearty and earthy flavors to the fried rice, which were quite appealing, and which made the meal all the more filling. Needles to say, this dish is going into regular rotation, mushrooms and all!


While Cary’s happy to talk food here, she’s also pretty good at doling out words about video games at United We Game while simultaneously maintaining her own blog, Recollections of Play. You can also find an archive of fun, geeky articles from her and like-minded souls at Geek Force Network.

 

How to Drink Like a Canadian: the caesar

Canada and America share the world’s longest undefended border, and as you can imagine there are plenty of cultural similarities between the two countries. But beware if you visit Canada and order a caesar — you’re probably not going to get a salad. Instead, you’ll be served a big icy glass of delicious vodka spice. Yessss.

The caesar was invented in 1969 by a restaurant manager in Calgary, Alberta and it’s been a Canadian hit ever since. Similar (but importantly different) to the bloody mary, caesars are traditionally tangy and spicy and often served at brunch or in hot weather. As with any cocktail you can make it in a number of different subtle ways, but the caesar has one essential ingredient and that’s Clamato. Clamato, for Americans not in the know, is a combination of (wait for it)… tomato and clam juice. Hey, where are you going?

For the uninitiated “clam juice” sounds kind of terrifying, I know. But in Clamato it just adds a lovely salty umami taste to the tomato juice. Clamato is also heavily sweetened. Look, I know it sounds weird, but trust me. An entire nation of brunch-goers can’t all be wrong!

caesar

Everyone has their own recipe, but this is how I make my perfect caesar:

1. Fill a big glass with ice.
2. Add 1.5 oz of cold vodka
3. Add about 3 shakes of Worcestershire sauce
4. Add about 3 shakes of Tobasco sauce
5. Give a quick squirt of lime juice
5. Add cold Clamato to fill the rest of the glass
6. Sprinkle just a shake or two of salt and some good twists of fresh ground black pepper
7. Stir and enjoy

The caesar is best a few minutes after preparing once a bit of the ice has melted. I like to drink it with a straw.

Much like America’s bloody mary in the last few years caesar garnishes have gotten more and more elaborate, growing from just a celery stick to monstrosities that require their own salad plate to manage. For heaven’s sake, don’t do that. If you want a garnish, I suggest a nice pickled bean, a stalk of pickled asparagus, or just a lime wedge.

Now you’re drinking like a Canadian, eh!

Recipe: Light Cheese Quiche

This is a healthier take on the traditional egg and cheese quiche. It is very light and fluffy, yet still plenty filling. I use store bought pie crust, but you can make your own crust if you are into that kind of thing. I also like to add diced ham or crumbled bacon along with the onion. If you add a salty meat, you can leave out all but a pinch of the salt.

Ingredients:

1 refrigerated pie crust or pie dough for single crust (deep dish works best)
2 teaspoons butter
1 large onion, finely chopped
2 large eggs
2 large egg whites
1/2 cup shredded hard cheese such as Asiago, Romano or Parmesan (I like using a blend of all 3); or Gruyere
1 1/2 cups low fat (1%) milk
1/2 teaspoon salt (you can cut this in half if you use one of the saltier cheeses like Asiago)
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
pinch of ground nutmeg

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Press dough onto bottom and against side of a pie plate, crimp edge. Instead of pricking the crust to keep it from bubbling, line the dough with a sheet of foil and fill with dried beans or rice. Bake 10 minutes. Remove foil with beans/rice then continue baking for another 5-10 minutes until crust is golden. Set aside on wire rack to cool.

Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees. Melt butter in non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until golden, about 10 minutes. Whisk together eggs, egg whites, 1/4 cup shredded cheese, milk, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Spread onion (and added meat if desired) over bottom of pie shell. Pour egg mixture over onion and sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 cup of cheese.

For a more tender edge, carefully cover edge of crust with foil for half the remaining cook time. Bake until quiche is golden and knife inserted into center comes out clean, about 35 minutes. If you use a foil pie plate, you may want to bake on a light cookie sheet. Glass pie plates work fine directly on the oven rack.

Gai Pad Krapow, or chicken with basil

January is an odd month for food. After a few weeks of festivities around the holidays I’ve usually eaten my fill of decadent meals. Enough with the chocolate, with the gravy, with the rich stuffings and bread puddings. And along with my stomach, after the holidays my wallet is usually also going through a bit of a downsizing. Cheap, healthy food is certainly the order of the day.

But on the other hand I’m still a little worn out from cooking over the holidays, so I don’t really feel like an epic undertaking. And man, even if health and budget are concerns I’m still not going to suffer through eating something that tastes like cardboard. I want flavor, and freshness, and I want it now. I want.. Thai!

Gai Pad Krapow gets top marks in everything I’m looking for in a weeknight post-holiday dinner. The main ingredient is ground chicken, a healthier alternative to beef or pork. It’s amazingly simple to make, with most of the work being done chopping aromatics, and tastes delicious. Pair it with a bowl of rice for a heartier meal, or with a spicy cabbage salad for a lighter, lower-carb experience. You can change the exact nature of the sauces and peppers to create the flavor you want — I tend to go with a sweeter sauce to offset a really spicy salad.

Weeknight Gai Pad Krapow

Ingredients:

a head of butter lettuce
a package of ground chicken
a big (big!) bunch of Thai basil
4-ish garlic cloves, finely chopped
roughly the same amount of ginger, finely chopped
a large shallot, finely chopped
hot peppers to taste, finely chopped (fresno peppers are my favorite)
fish sauce
sweet Thai chili sauce
vegetable oil
salt and pepper

Preparation:

aromatics and basil for gai pad krapow

Pretty colors!

  1. Finely chop your garlic, ginger, shallot, and peppers.
  2. Chop the big stems off of your basil, but keep the leaves and little clusters whole.
  3. Put a couple of tablespoons of vegetable oil in a pan on about medium heat.
  4. Once the oil is hot, throw in your garlic, ginger, shallot, and peppers. Saute them until tender, about 3 minutes.
  5. Add the ground chicken to the pan.
  6. Once the chicken has a little sizzle on it, turn the pan down to medium-low and add the fish sauce (don’t be shy!), chili sauce, and salt and pepper.
  7. While you’re waiting for the chicken to cook all the way through, break the head of butter lettuce into a pile of full-sized leaves.
  8. Once the chicken is cooked, add all of the basil. Stir it in and cook until the basil is wilted and green, about 2 minutes.

You’re done! Go family style with a big bowl of chicken mixture and a plate of lettuce leaves for wrapping. Serve with rice or a spicy cabbage salad or both.


Jessica, aka Liore, can usually be found griping about video games on her blog and podcast at Herding Cats, or on Twitter. She likes saying “flavor profile” and dislikes measuring things. Jessica is currently super into Asian cuisines.

24-Hour Salad

Merry Christmas readers, followers, and cooks alike! While I’m more than thrilled that you stopped by the blogosphere on this holiday, hopefully most of you are enjoying a wonderful day filled with family and friends. Or food and presents. Well…mostly food and presents, as the case may be.

Unlike the more formal holiday of Thanksgiving, which requires some traditional fare, Christmas in my house is much more relaxed. But that doesn’t mean we don’t enjoy a few food “musts,” one of which includes a fruit salad I remember being a holiday staple since childhood — the 24-Hour Salad.

While there’s probably a definitive version of this fruit salad that has chopped fruit marinate in a light custard overnight, I wouldn’t know what it is! Since I started making this salad myself, I’ve discovered that there’s almost no limit to the fruit it can contain. I regularly alter it according to what’s available and who’s eating. (i.e. Marshmallows and I don’t get along very well, so I usually skip them.) As long as the fruit is compatible with egg, sugar, and cream, you’re good to go. If you’re short on fresh fruit, canned fruit works just as well.

And if the idea of fruit sitting overnight in cooked, creamy eggs is absolutely unappealing, forget it and just use the heavy cream whipped up with a little sugar. It’s not religion, just a tasty and light fruit salad.

24-Hour Salad

Ingredients

For the custard:

1 egg
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons white sugar
pinch of salt
(for the next day – 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream)

For the salad:

1 cup chopped pineapple, fresh or canned and drained
1 cup chopped orange or 1 small (8-9 ounce) can of mandarin oranges, drained
1 cup sliced seedless red grapes
1 cup chopped apples
8-12 sliced maraschino cherries (or sliced fresh cherries, if you’re lucky enough to get them at this time of year!)
1 cup mini marshmallows (optional)
(for the next day – 2 sliced bananas)

Instructions

Day one
In a double boiler or single sauce pan over low heat, beat the egg and stir in the lemon juice, sugar, and salt. With a wooden spoon, constantly stir the mixture until thickened, about 5 minutes. Remove custard from the heat and cool.

Combine all fruit together, except the bananas, in a large bowl. Stir in the custard, cover, and refrigerate overnight.

Day two
Drain any excess liquid from the salad and stir in 2 sliced bananas. Whip the cream until thick and stir into the salad. Can be eaten immediately or chilled.

*****

This salad is best eaten the day its made as the bananas will quickly go brown in any leftovers. You can freshen up any remaining salad with a bit of extra whipped cream, if necessary.


Let’s see just how many blogs Cary can put on her roster before going mad! While you’ll find her here on occasion, you’ll more likely to catch her over on United We Game or Geek Force Network; or better yet, working on her own blog about gaming and nostalgia and such, Recollections of Play.